[Euripides] å Medea and Other Plays [wicca PDF] Read Online è chorvatsko.pro

[Euripides] å Medea and Other Plays [wicca PDF] Read Online è 3.
5 stars Four Plays Which Exemplify His Interest In Flawed, Characters Who Defy The Expectations Of Greek SocietyThe Four Tragedies Collected In This Volume All Focus On A Central Character, Once Powerful, Brought Down By Betrayal, Jealousy, Guilt And Hatred The First Playwright To Depict Suffering Without Reference To The Gods, Euripides Made His Characters Speak In Human Terms And Face The Consequences Of Their Actions In Medea, A Woman Rejected By Her Lover Takes Hideous Revenge By Murdering The Children They Both Love, And Hecabe Depicts The Former Queen Of Troy, Driven Mad By The Prospect Of Her Daughter S Sacrifice To Achilles Electra Portrays A Young Woman Planning To Avenge The Brutal Death Of Her Father At The Hands Of Her Mother, While In Heracles The Hero Seeks Vengeance Against The Evil King Who Has Caused Bloodshed In His Family Philip Vellacott S Lucid Translation Is Accompanied By An Introduction, Which Discusses The Literary Background Of Classical Athens And Examines The Distinction Between Instinctive And Civilized Behaviour This is Euripides I, from the University of Chicago Press, which published The Complete Greek Tragedies I have a soft spot in my heart for these, regardless of how well or ill one judges the translations and you d have to be a better scholar than I to have a serious opinion on that score My soft spot owes to recollections of my undergraduate days, when I read this same edition as a freshman What a great awakening no, that s a bit too pat what an intriguing alternative to the Ozzie Harriet Abbie and Jerry and Allen Americas that were warring at that time Alcestis is the story of a wife who volunteers to the gods to die instead of her husband The Medea is the original for Fatal Attraction, and, like so much Greek thought which we inevitably return to, does it all on a bigger stage A vindictive King of Argos gets his come uppance in General Introduction Notes, by Richard RutherfordNote on the TextFurther ReadingChronological TableTranslator s Note Preface to Alcestis Alcestis Preface to Medea Medea Preface to The Children of Heracles The Children of Heracles Preface to Hippolytus Hippolytus NotesBibliographyGlossary of Mythological and Geographical Names 3.
5 stars Medea Anything for Revenge Reading progress update I ve read 138 out of 206 pages Medea You will regret what you did to me, Jason Jason I regretted it alright How great can your anger be To what extent are you ready to hurt those who hurt you Would you kill your own children to appease a great offense Medea is ready to do anything it takes to hurt Jason She takes his wife, his children, and his happiness What I find fascinating in this play is that I am still sympathetic to Medea after all she did It feels wrong to be on her side as much as Jason s side, but she advances reasons to her actions that makes one wonder if she is right except of course for killing her children since that is unforgivable She is clever with words, and she manipulates the others the way she pleases One is tempted to think that she wen Medea Anything for Revenge Reading progress update I ve read 138 out of 206 pages Medea You will regret what you did to me, Jason Jason I regretted it alright How great can your anger be To what extent are you ready to hurt those who hurt you Would you kill your own children to appease a great offense Medea is ready to do anything it takes to hurt Jason She takes his wife, his children, and his happiness What I find fascinating in this play is that I am still sympathetic to Medea after all she did It feels wrong to be on her side as much as Jason s side, but she advances reasons to her actions that makes one wonder if she is right except of course for killing her children since that is unforgivable She is clever with words, and she manipulates the others the way she pleases One is tempted to think that she wen It s always surprising how brutal and bloody Greek tragedies are but never nihilistic The one who wrongs will be pursued by the Gods, and usually the entire bloodline is cursed Medea Medea is angry that her husband Jason is taking a new wife, he wants to ban her from the city as she s dangerous, she plans revenge and murders the new wife as well as her own children since that will hurt her husband She survives and escapes the city with the bodies of the children.
Hecabe Ex queen of Troy, now slave, has to watch as her daughter is sacrificed by the Greeks looking for good omens to return she also learns that her son was murdered earlier by a trusted friend, so she plots revenge on Polymestor, and traps him with her friends they stab out his eyes and murder his children Agamemnon sends the blind Polymestor away without bloodshed after I ve reviewed the individual plays from this volume of Euripides plays the first of five volumes, all of which I have and will read in order separately they are the earliest surviving plays and include the well known Medea as well as Hyppolytus, which aside from Medea stood out to me in this collection.
43 Euripides I Alcestis, The Medea, The Heracleidae, Hippolytus The Complete Greek Tragedies published 1955 my copy is a 26th printing from 1993 format 224 page Paperbackacquired May 30 from a Half Price booksread July 5 9rating 4 starsEach play had a different translatorAlcestis 481 bce translated by Latti, Richard c1955The Medea 431 bce translated by David Grene c1944The Heracleidae circa 430 bce translated by Rex Warner c1955Hippolytus by 428 bce translated by Ralph Gladstone c1942 Perhaps the most significant remark about Euripides and Sophocles is that supposed to have been made by Sophocles, that he himself showed men as they ought to be or as one ought to show them but Euripides showed them as they I picked this book of plays by Euripides primarily for Medea, so that will earn the brunt of my review.
Medea is one kick ass, crazy bitch Period Having read Jason and the Golden Fleece and thoroughly enjoyed it I was excited to read about Medea, particularly her story after helping Jason find the Golden Fleece Talk about one spurned lover After Jason leaves Medea for a Greek princess, Medea goes a little bye bye and decides the best way for her to express her distaste is to kill off her children Someone get that lady a diary or a canvas or something Girl, there are better ways of creatively expressing your feelings than going straight for the spawn I m just sayin.
Really though, she s not a woman to be trifled with and while I love her story I m a little peeved with Euripides for portraying yet another woman on the crazy side of things I have mixed reactions to these plays Medea was superb I was astonished at how modern the themes were But Electra was such a disappointment in contrast the characters never really leapt off the page Here are my reviews of the two I have read so far MEDEA Daughter of a King Niece of nymph Granddaughter of a god Wife of a hero How many women have you known in any literary piece ever written, in all history of humanity, who incarnate all of these blessings together in one A fistful, maybe Killer of her own children Ok Now you are definitely left with ONE only MEDEA A symbol A metaphor A precedent A uniqueness ONE and only in millennia What else can one say.
This is Euripides I, from the University of Chicago Press, which published The Complete Greek Tragedies I have a soft spot in my heart for these, regardless of how well or ill one judges the translations and you d have to be a better scholar than I to have a serious opinion on that score My soft spot owes to recollections of my undergraduate days, when I read this same edition as a freshman What a great awakening no, that s a bit too pat what an intriguing alternative to the Ozzie Harriet Abbie and Jerry and Allen Americas that were warring at that time Alcestis is the story of a wife who volunteers to the gods to die instead of her husband The Medea is the original for Fatal Attraction, and, like so much Greek thought which we inevitably return to, does it all on a bigger stage A vindictive King of Argos gets his come uppance in

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