[Gavin Weightman] ✓ Eureka [m-f-romance PDF] Read Online Ê chorvatsko.pro

[Gavin Weightman] ✓ Eureka [m-f-romance PDF] Read Online Ê There s an interesting point made by Gavin Weightman in Eureka the way that many inventions were the brainchild of an amateur, a tinkerer, who managed to get the invention going pretty badly, before it was then picked up elsewhere, typically by a larger organization which carried it forward to become a commercial or practical product It s certainly true of the five examples he focusses on in the book.
These are powered flight, television, the barcode, the PC and the mobile phone cellphone In each case, Weightman gives us a long section in which he introduces that individual or small team of amateurs, plunges back into their historical antecedents because invention doesn t come from nowhere, there is plenty of groundwork that precedes it and then takes us through the detailed work of the amateurs and the way that the invention was then taken up and commercialised.
For me, the two best sec Weightman focuses on five significant inventions the airplane, television, bar code, personal computer, and mobile phone starting with what he calls the Eureka moment and moving backwards to show the discoveries and innovations that paved the way for the invention Pretty much every time a new person is introduced we get a short biography of them and often, somewhat distractingly, their parents or even their grandparents I guess it fits with the whole standing on the shoulders of giants theme, but it does get a little silly and times, disrupting the flow and feeling a bit like the author was just trying to pad the book to a certain length As I was reading the book, I kept coming back to the technological fallacy that Mark Kurlansky dwells on his book Paper Kurlansky contends that peopl I had troubles rating this book The scope of the research is really impressive, the background of all the 5 inventions described very detailed It s a kind of a mind opener, I wouldn t imagine how big input to these inventions had the amatours or enthusiasts, and how various inventors worked on the same problem independently And the conclusion one of them and all of them are worth considering , that if Bell wouldn t invent the telephone, somebody else would do even if most of the world would find such thing irrelevant at that time.
However, reading Eureka I felt the lack of technical or scientific knowledge myself and at some point especially when the TV is discussed I couldn t visualize the elements of the process, which make the narration difficult to follow I also sometimes got lost between the number of people in



Very interesting book but also rife with sexist bias It understates the merits of Ada Lovelace in a quite insulting fashion, and systematically diminish women s activities Among the many inventors who get focus, there isn t a single woman quoted for her achievements For example Bowers funded Apple, Noyce did not Yet in a single sentence in the book describes Noyce as an adventurous venture capitalist who loves risk and invests in all kinds of things Bowers just also liked to dabble a little in shares and that s all the patronizing credit she gets Repeat for every single female figure that gets a mention.
I recommend to read it, I learned a lot, but Its sexist bias is pervasive, if subtle The premise and conclusion read like wishful thinking and selection bias than like something backed up by data.
This summary of five inventions is an easy, engaging read, but it feels a bit disorganized at times By the author s account, he simply set out to explore the inventions that influence our daily lives, but he emerged with a tale of invention by outsiders He concludes that we cannot expect innovation from scientists or industry, but must rely on those outside the system.
His thesis of outsiders doesn t exactly work He mentions the invention of the transistor Bell Labs in passing and portrays Faraday as an outsider to academia Yes, certainly Faraday started outside academia, but lived most of his career inside it Most people who end up in industry and academia in the last couple hundred years were not born into them they came from somewhere else So I don t find his stor There s an interesting point made by Gavin Weightman in Eureka the way that many inventions were the brainchild of an amateur, a tinkerer, who managed to get the invention going pretty badly, before it was then picked up elsewhere, typically by a larger organization which carried it forward to become a commercial or practical product It s certainly true of the five examples he focusses on in the book.
These are powered flight, television, the barcode, the PC and the mobile phone cellphone In each case, Weightman gives us a long section in which he introduces that individual or small team of amateurs, plunges back into their historical antecedents because invention doesn t come from nowhere, there is plenty of groundwork that precedes it and then takes us through the detailed work of the amateurs and the way that the i Five essays focusing on inventions that have changed the world powered flight, television, barcodes, the home computer and the mobile phone As always the histories, from Gavin Weightman, give credence to how developments were never reliant on just one individual they were instead dependent upon discoveries and new ideas that were just waiting for the right time and place to coalesce into something than the sum of their parts To emphasise this reliance on ideas converging, the essays start at the Eureka moment and then work backwards to understand the innovations that had come before, some of which were admitted to by the final patent owners, many others forgotten.
Whilst each invention differs greatly there are narrative similarities, such as th Tracing The Long Pre History Of Five Twentieth Century Inventions Which Have Transformed Our Lives, Gavin Weightman Reveals A Fantastic Cast Of Scientists And Inspired Amateurs Whose Ingenuity Has Given Us The Airplane, Television, Bar Code, Personal Computer, And Mobile Phone Not One Of These Inventions Can Be Attributed To A Lone Genius Who Experiences A Moment Of Inspiration Nearly All Innovations Exist In The Imagination Before They Are Finally Made To Work By The Hard Graft Of Inventors Who Draw On The Discoveries Of Others While The Discoveries Of Scientists Have Provided Vital Knowledge Which Has Made Innovation Possible, It Is A Revelation Of Weightman S Study That It Is Often Than Not The Amateur Who Enjoys The Eureka Moment When An Invention Works For The First Time Filled With Fascinating Stories Of Struggle, Rivalry, And The Ingenuity Of Both Famous Inventors And Hundreds Of Forgotten People, Weightman S Captivating Work Is A Triumph Of Storytelling That Offers A Fresh Take On The Making Of Our Modern World I received this book a part of the Goodreads first reads giveaways I really found it interesting I like that the book looks at the Eureka moments of different inventions and traces them back through various historical developments I was so interested to learn for example, how Muybridge s photographs assisted in the development of the television It drew connections between various inventions that aren t always so clear and shows how invention doesn t happen in a vacuum but is a continuum of development and discovery throughout history I just wish the book included diagrams and images, especially when they are referred to in the book, for example some of the preliminary designs for various flying machines were a little hard to visualize from the description and probably would have been clarifyed by including images.
I entered the contest for my wife She is a big history major She thoroughly appreciated it She said she enjoyed the back story of all the inventions in the book She didn t know some of that information.

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